Posted on 1 Comment

Different Fabrics in Clothing Industry and Manufacture

“Subsequently you will find a survey of the different fabrics we use in the manufacturing of our Noëki fashion lines.”

Different fabrics in clothing industry and manufacture.

Jersey 

is a knit fabric used predominantly for clothing manufacture. It was originally made of wool, but is now made of wool, cotton, and synthetic fibers. Since medieval times Jersey, Channel Islands, where the material was first produced, had been an important exporter of knitted goods and the fabric in wool from Jersey became well known. The fabric can be a very stretchy single knitting, usually light-weight, jersey with one flat side and one piled side. When made with a lightweight yarn, this is the fabric most often used to make T-shirts. Or it can be a double knitted jersey (interlock jersey), with less stretch, that creates a heavier fabric of two single jerseys knitted together to leave the two flat sides on the outsides of the fabric, with the piles in the middle. Jersey is considered to be an excellent fabric for draped garments, such as dresses, and women’s tops.

Warp knitting (tricot)

Warp knitting (tricot) is a family of knitting methods in which the yarn zigzags along the length of the fabric, i.e., following adjacent columns (“wales”) of knitting, rather than a single row (“course”). For comparison, knitting across the width of the fabric is called weft knitting.
Since warp knitting requires that the number of separate strands of yarn (“ends”) equals the number of stitches in a row, warp knitting is almost always done by machine rather than by hand.
Tricot comprises several types of knitted fabrics. All warp-knit fabrics are resistant to runs and relatively easy to sew.
Tricot is very common in lingerie. The right side of the fabric has fine lengthwise ribs while the reverse has crosswise ribs. The properties of these fabrics include having a soft and ‘drapey’ texture with some lengthwise stretch and almost no crosswise stretch.

Interlock

is a variation on rib knit. Instead of creating ridges of knit and purl stitches, interlock has two rows of stitches, one directly behind the other. This can create the impression that the fabric is comprised of two layers, which is why it is sometimes categorized as a double-knit fabric. (The two layers of interlock, however, can’t actually be separated.) Interlock is thicker than jersey, and both sides of the fabric are smooth, like the right side of a jersey fabric. Interlock is more stable than jersey, which means it doesn’t stretch out of shape as easily as jersey and it doesn’t curl at the edges. This ability to lie flat, as well as the fact that interlock take prints nicely, makes it popular for home sewing.

Velours

Velour or velours is a plush, knitted fabric or textile similar to velvet or velveteen. It is usually made from cotton, but can also be made from synthetic materials such as polyester. Velour is used in a wide variety of applications, including clothing and upholstery. Other examples include car seats, leotards and robes.
Velour can be a woven or a knitted fabric, allowing it to stretch. It combines the stretchy properties of knits with the rich appearance and feel of velvet.

Terrycloth

Terrycloth, or simply toweling is a fabric with loops that can absorb large amounts of water. It can be manufactured by weaving or knitting. Toweling is woven on special looms that have two beams of longitudinal warp through which the filler or weft is fired laterally. The first industrial production of terrycloth towels, in 1850, was initiated by the English manufacturer Christy.
There are two types of terry fabrics:

Towel Terry is a woven fabric with long loops that can absorb large amounts of water. Its content is usually 100% cotton, but may sometimes contain polyester.

French Terry (or Frotté)

French Terry (or Frotté) is a fabric, used in men’s, women’s and children’s clothes. One of its sides is flat, while the other side is with cross loops. It is either 100% cotton or contains polyester with elastaine (lycra). It is often warp knitted, and the term French Terry is colloquially used for all warp knitted Terry. It is the length of loops that determines how much fluid is absorbed by the cloth as longer loops provide more surface area to absorb and come in contact with the fluid.

“AS YOU CAN SEE, CHOOSING NOËKI IS CHOOSING EXCLUSIVITY, HIGH QUALITY AND SUSTAINABILITY” Enjoy shopping!

 

1 thought on “Different Fabrics in Clothing Industry and Manufacture

  1. I see you don’t monetize your website, don’t waste your traffic, you can earn extra bucks every month because you’ve got high quality content.
    If you want to know how to make extra money, search for: Ercannou’s essential
    adsense alternative

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *